cavities Archives - Downtown Toronto Dentist | Toronto Dentistry | Soho Dental cavities Archives - Downtown Toronto Dentist | Toronto Dentistry | Soho Dental

Downtown Toronto Dentist | Toronto Dentistry | Soho Dental


  Contact : 416-340-SOHO (7646)

All Posts Tagged: cavities

Veneers

When do we consider veneers instead of bonding?

Meet “Carol”. Carol was concerned about the appearance of her front teeth. She had previous bonding in the past which had stained and chipped. The two lateral incisors are also dark when compared to the other teeth. 

In order to improve Carol’s smile, we needed to mask the darkness of the lateral incisors and lengthen them in order to achieve pleasing proportions. The two front teeth also had to be narrowed very slightly in order to balance the smile. With the changes needed in the colour and shape of the teeth, in addition to the fact that the teeth already had bonding that was failing, I decided that veneers were the best treatment option for Carol. 

How do I determine the correct proportions? Before we started any treatment, I took a series of photographs and study models in order to plan Carol’s treatment.  I then let Carol try out the proposed changes with temporary veneers

Temporary veneers are a very important part of the treatment because they allow me to fine tune the way the future veneers will look, feel and function during speaking and chewing. The front teeth have a very precise position in the mouth in order to look and feel good and the temporary veneers help me determine that position. 

The picture of the veneers is a few years after the original picture was taken. Carol has been speaking, chewing and smiling with these veneers for some time now. I wonder if Carol realizes how much she makes me smile when she comes in for her cleanings

Read More

How Acidic Foods Affect Teeth And Which To Avoid

When families gear up to indulge in their favorite foods during the holiday season, tradition often puts numerous acidic foods on the dinner table. If they’re on yours, do you know what they can do to your teeth? There are numerous types of foods that fall into this category.

Foods to Avoid

Oranges, grapefruits, lemons, limes and similarly common fruit items are as acidic as they are healthy, which is why it’s important to consume them with water to ensure they don’t harm your enamel. However, these products aren’t the only foods out there known for their low pH level. Others include:

  • Pickles
  • Cranberries
  • Tomato products (pasta sauce, ketchup, salsa, hot sauce)
  • Coffee
  • Alcohol (wine)

Why They Hurt

When the acids in the foods you eat and drink cause tooth enamel to wear away, teeth can become discolored as a result. And when tooth enamel weakens in this way, demineralization has started to occur – leaving your teeth’s dentin exposed and prone to sensitivity. Brushing after a meal is generally a good idea, but avoid doing so right after consuming acidic foods. Acid softens your enamel, and brushing too soon will only speed up tooth wear before the enamel has time to settle again. Unfortunately, demineralization can lead to tooth decay.

How to Lessen Dental Erosion

Try eating any acidic foods alongside foods that have a higher pH level, and are therefore low in acidity. Some of these foods include nuts, cheese, oatmeal, mangos, melons, bananas, apples, eggs, vegetables, brown rice and whole grains. Fish and lean meats also have low levels of acid. These foods may actually help protect your tooth enamel, giving you a nice double benefit. They do this by neutralizing acids in otherwise acidic saliva, and by providing the calcium and phosphorus needed to put minerals back in the teeth.

Prevention

See your dental professional twice a year for dental cleanings, which play an important role in maintaining your oral health by helping to identify dental erosion in its early stages. If there is a need, they can counsel you on making healthy dietary choices to stop dental erosion if your eating habits are contributing. Outside the dental chair, keep your mouth moist by drinking plenty of water so saliva can cleanse your mouth of these acids regularly. Use a fluoride toothpaste, which can help to repair tooth enamel and reduce your risk of decay. Keep in mind that according to the American Dental Association (ADA) fluoride furthers the remineralization of the tooth enamel. Swishing with a fluoride mouthwash will also help to lessen the severity of dental erosion. Be sure to floss once a day in your daily oral health routine, too.

Don’t overlook the little things behind your daily routine, either. Chewing sugar-free gum can increase saliva flow, allowing it to neutralize acids and help teeth to stay strong. After all, a healthy mouth will only help you enjoy your favorite cuisine!

Author:  Diana Tosuni-O’Neill RDH, BS
Article originally appeared at: http://www.colgate.ca

Read More
Teeth and Soda

What You Need To Know About Dental Erosion

What is dental erosion?

Erosion is the loss of tooth enamel caused by acid attack. Enamel is the hard, protective coating of the tooth, which protects the sensitive dentine underneath. When the enamel is worn away, the dentine underneath is exposed, which may lead to pain and sensitivity.

How do I know I have dental erosion?

Erosion usually shows up as hollows in the teeth and a general wearing away of the tooth surface and biting edges. This can expose the dentine underneath, which is a darker, yellower colour than the enamel. Because the dentine is sensitive, your teeth can also be more sensitive to heat and cold, or acidic foods and drinks.

What causes dental erosion?

Every time you eat or drink anything acidic, the enamel on your teeth becomes softer for a short while, and loses some of its mineral content. Your saliva will slowly cancel out this acidity in your mouth and get it back to its natural balance. However, if this acid attack happens too often, your mouth does not have a chance to repair itself and tiny bits of enamel can be brushed away. Over time, you start to lose the surface of your teeth.

Are there any medical problems which can cause dental erosion?

Bulimia is a condition where patients make themselves sick so that they lose weight. Because there are high levels of acid in the vomit, this can cause damage to tooth enamel.

Acids produced by the stomach can come up into the mouth (this is called gastro-oesophageal reflux). People suffering from hiatus hernia or oesophageal problems, or who drink too much alcohol, may also find they suffer from dental erosion due to vomiting.

Can my diet help prevent dental erosion?

Acidic foods and drinks can cause erosion. Acidity is measured by its ‘pH value’, and anything that has a pH value lower than 5.5 is more acidic and can harm your teeth.

Fizzy drinks, sodas, pops and carbonated drinks can cause erosion. It is important to remember that even the ‘diet’ brands are still harmful. Even flavoured fizzy waters can have an effect if drunk in large amounts, as they contain weak acids which can harm your teeth.

Acidic foods and drinks such as fruit and fruit juices – particularly citrus ones including lemon and orange – contain natural acids which can be harmful to your teeth, especially if you have a lot of them often.

‘Alcopops’, ‘coolers’ and ‘designer drinks’ that contain acidic fruits and are fizzy can cause erosion too.

Plain, still water is the best drink for teeth. Milk is also good because it helps to cancel out the acids in your mouth.

Are sports drinks safe?

Many sports drinks contain ingredients that can cause dental erosion as well as decay. However, it is important for athletes to avoid dehydration because this can lead to a dry mouth and bad breath.

What can I do to prevent dental erosion?

There are a number of things you can do:

  • Have acidic food and drinks, and fizzy drinks, sodas and pops, just at mealtimes. This will reduce the number of acid attacks on your teeth.
  • Drink quickly, without holding the drink in your mouth or ‘swishing’ it around your mouth. Or use a straw to help drinks go to the back of your mouth and avoid long contact with your teeth.
  • Finish a meal with cheese or milk as this will help cancel out the acid.
  • Chew sugar-free gum after eating. This will help produce more saliva to help cancel out the acids which form in your mouth after eating.Wait for at least one hour after eating or drinking anything acidic before brushing your teeth. This gives your teeth time to build up their mineral content again.
  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and at least one other time during the day, with fluoride toothpaste. Use a small-headed brush with medium to soft bristles.

Should I use any other special products?

As well as using a fluoride toothpaste, your dental team may suggest you use a fluoride-containing mouthwash and have a fluoride varnish applied at least every six months. They may also prescribe a toothpaste with more fluoride in it.

How can it be treated?

Dental erosion does not always need to be treated. With regular check-ups and advice your dental team can prevent the problem getting any worse and the erosion going any further. If a tooth does need treatment, it is important to protect the enamel and the dentine underneath to prevent sensitivity. Usually, simply bonding a filling onto the tooth will be enough to repair it. However, in more severe cases the dentist may need to fit a veneer.

How much will treatment cost?

Costs will vary, depending on the type of treatment you need.

It is important to talk about all the treatment options with your dental team and get a written estimate of the cost before starting treatment.

Content originally appeared at: https://www.dentalhealth.org

Read More

You Might Be More Prone to Cavities

You Might Be More Prone to CavitiesYou brush and floss daily and don’t snack on sugary treats, yet you’ve had your fair share of cavities. Your friend, on the other hand, is lax with the dental hygiene and lives on energy drinks and junk food, yet rarely has a cavity. What gives?

Cavities, which result from a disease process called dental caries, are areas of decay caused by certain oral bacteria. As the decay progresses, the bacteria can eventually invade the living portion of the tooth (dentin and pulp) and is considered a bacterial infection. At that point professional dental treatment is required to remove the infection, stop the disease process and seal the tooth.

This disease process requires certain combinations of conditions in order to progress. So it’s likely that you have more of those conditions, or risk factors, than your friend does. Don’t beat yourself up; while there are lots of things you can do to minimize risks, there are also factors that aren’t so easily controlled.

Tooth Decay Risk Factors

Let’s take a look at those risk factors:

  • Oral Bacteria — Cavities start with bacteria that build up on tooth surfaces in a sticky film called plaque where they feed on sugars and carbohydrates from the foods/beverages we consume, creating acids in the process. Acids dissolve the mineral bonds in the protective layer of tooth enamel, which makes it easier for bacteria to penetrate what is otherwise the hardest substance in the human body and infect the tooth. Your unique oral “microbiome” make-up could have more or less of the microbe species implicated in dental caries, and some strains of the same bugs are more aggressive than others.
  • Dental hygiene — Brushing and flossing correctly and regularly helps dislodge bacterial plaque and trapped food particles. Regular checkups and professional cleanings are also important to remove plaque that has hardened into “tartar.”
  • Diet — Minimizing your intake of sugary foods and carbohydrates reduces the availability of fuel for cavity-causing bacteria. Meanwhile, acidic foods and beverages can erode enamel, and the more frequently they are consumed, the less opportunity saliva has to restore the mouth to its normal pH.
  • Dry mouth — Saliva contains minerals that help neutralize acids and rebuild tooth enamel. Without a healthy flow, your ability to prevent decay is compromised. Certain medications, chemotherapy and some diseases can cause dry mouth. Drinking lots of water and using enamel-fortifying mouth rinses can help counter the effects.
  • Tooth shape — Tooth decay is most likely to develop in back teeth — molars and bicuspids (premolars) — where the tiny fissures on their biting surface tend to trap food and bacteria. Genetics determines how deep your fissures are.
  • Gum recession — Receding gums expose the tooth root, which isn’t protected by enamel and therefore more susceptible to decay.
  • Other factors — Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and vomiting can create highly acidic conditions in the mouth. Retainers, orthodontic appliances and bite or night guards tend to restrict saliva flow over teeth, promoting plaque formation; fixed appliances like braces can make it more difficult to brush and floss effectively.

To learn more about your level of risk and how you can stack the odds more in your favor, talk with your dentist.

Content courtesy deardoctor.com

 

Read More

Filling Cavities in the Front Teeth

In our latest video watch a time lapse procedure of the filling of cavities in the front teeth of a patient at Soho Dental in Toronto. This is a common, simple and relatively painless procedure we regularly perform at our clinic.
Read More