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I can see clearly now. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Being 50 feels exactly like being 49. Well almost like 49. I quickly realized that I could no longer see things very close to me. As a dentist, I really like to see things that are close me. Enter progressive lenses! The first few weeks are dizzying but perseverance pays off with the ability to see near and far. This makes me very happy. I’m told that this makes my patients very happy as well. 😄 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Thanks to Dr Heeney and her team @spadina.optometry for fitting me with these stylish frames. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
#sohoblog #dentist #torontodentist #torontoentertainmentdistrict #entertainmentdistrict #entertainmentdistricttoronto #kingwest #kingwestlife #kingstreetwest #torontoliving #torontolife #torontolifestyle #torontolifemagazine #scrubs #scrublife #generationx #turning50 #downtowntorontolife #glasses #lunettes #ogieyewear #sohodental #dentistsofinstagram #spadinaavenue #the6ix #toronto

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These rings support the bands that we use create the correct form when placing a tooth coloured filling. We try to recreate the original tooth anatomy so that your filling looks, feels and functions naturally. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
#torontodentist #teeth #compositerestoration #waterpik #whitefilling #nikon #dentalphotography #sohodental #toronto
@ Toronto, Ontario

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How Dietary Acids Can Cause Tooth Erosion

Think that only sweet-tasting drinks and snacks are harmful for your teeth? Think again.

Sugar isn’t the only dietary factor that can damage your smile. Foods and beverages that are high in acids wear away the enamel that protects your teeth, a process known as tooth erosion. This changes the appearance of your teeth and opens the door for bacteria that can cause cavities or infection.

What Does Tooth Erosion Do to My Teeth?

Tooth erosion is permanent. If your enamel has started to wear away, you may:

  • Feel pain or sensitivity when consuming hot, cold or sweet drinks
  • Notice a yellowish discoloration of the teeth
  • Find that your fillings have changed
  • Face greater risks for more cavities over time
  • Develop an abscess, in very extreme cases
  • Experience tooth loss, also in very extreme cases
  • Once erosion occurs, you may need fillings, crowns, a root canal or even tooth removal. Veneers may also be an option to restore the look of your smile.

Acidic Foods and Beverages to Watch For

Here’s a quick tip: If what you’re eating or drinking is citrus or citrus-flavored, carbonated or sour, it’s best to limit how much you consume.

Nutritious, acidic foods like tomatoes and citrus fruits can have some acidic effects on tooth enamel, so eat them as part of a meal, not by themselves. Dried fruits, including raisins, can also cause problems because they are sticky and adhere to teeth, so the acids produced by cavity-causing bacteria continue to harm teeth long after you stop eating them.

Still, the major erosion culprit is soft drinks, especially soda and sports drinks. Even if they are sugar-free, they are more likely to be acidic thanks to carbonation. That bubbly fizz raises the acid level of any drink, regardless of its flavor.

Acid in beverages can also come from citrus flavorings such as lemon, lime and orange. Even all-natural beverages like orange juice or fresh-squeezed lemonade are higher in acid than regular water, so make them an occasional treat instead of a daily habit.

And speaking of treats, some sour candies are almost as acidic as battery acid, and many use citric acids to get that desired effect. If you like a little sour with your sweet tooth, please pucker in moderation.

Tips for Protecting Your Teeth

You can reduce tooth erosion from what you eat and drink by following these tips:

Wait an hour before you brush after eating acidic foods to give your saliva a chance to naturally wash away acids and re-harden your enamel.

  • Limit – or avoid – acidic beverages like soft drinks. If you do indulge, use a straw.
  • When drinking something like a soft drink, do not swish or hold it in your mouth longer than you need to. Just sip and swallow.
  • After acidic meals or beverages, rinse your mouth with water, drink milk or enjoy a snack of cheese right afterward. Dairy and other calcium-rich foods can help neutralize acids.
  • Saliva helps keep acids under control. To keep your saliva flowing and protecting your teeth, chew sugarless gum with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • Look for dental health products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. This means the product is safe and effective, and some have been awarded the ADA Seal specifically because they help prevent and reduce enamel erosion from dietary acids.
  • Talk to your dentist. Your dentist can explain the effects of nutritional choices on your teeth, including the various foods and beverages to choose and which ones to avoid. Knowing all you can about the effects of what you eat and drink on your teeth can help keep your smile bright over a lifetime.

Article originally appeared at: https://www.mouthhealthy.org

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Soho Dental Instagram Post

Small changes can have a meaningful impact. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The spaces between the teeth were closed with simple direct bonding using Bioclear matrices. It is simple procedure that requires no anesthesia and takes about a hour to complete. Please visit our YouTube channel to see how this is done. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
#sohoblog #dentist #torontodentist #dentalphotographgroup #diastema #diastemaclosure #dentalbonding #toothbonding #aestheticdentistry #cosmeticdentistry #dentalphotography #nikond750 #nikonmacro #sohodental #toronto #bioclear #bioclearmatrix

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The beauty of nature unveils itself in many forms from the grandest to the minute. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
4 Emax crowns. I am truly amazed at how beautifully nature can be replicated with modern ceramics. My gratitude to the expert craftsmanship of Jim Globocki. This is a result of a true partnership between dentist and technician, each meeting the expectations of the other. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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#sohoblog #dentist #dentistry #dentista #dentiste #odontologia #dentistrylife #emax #dentalcrowns #prosthodontics #prostho #dentaltechnician #dentaltechnology #cosmeticdentistry #aestheticdentistry #dentalphotography #dentalphotographgroup #nikon #nikonmacro #gratitude #backtowork #perfectsmileslab #sohodental #toronto

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May your New Year glitter and shine like gold. .
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Still one of the best restorative materials that we have in dentistry. Classics never go out of fashion. .
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#sohoblog #dentist #dentiste #dentista #odontologia #dentistry #torontodentist #dentaltechnology #dentaltechnician #prosthodontics #dentalcrown #dentalanatomy #dentalphotography #perfectsmileslab #sohodental #newyear #toronto

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Diastema closure. The patient’s sole chief complaint was the space between the teeth. .
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The challenge here is the substrate. A porcelain layered to zirconia bridge and a porcelain crown.
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☑️Rubber dam isolation
☑️Microetch Al. oxide.
☑️Interface etch/silane
☑️Optibond FL
☑️Brilliant Everglow A2
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#sohoblog

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soother

Are Pacifiers Helpful or Detrimental to Baby’s Developing Teeth and Jaw?

Did you know that the pacifier was invented by Christian Meinecke, a Manhattan druggist, in 1901? Before this modern pacifier was created, babies would suck on knotted rags dipped in water or honey or wooden beads or ‘gum sticks’ made of stone, bone or coral.  As the mothers quickly adopted the use of this new pacifier, it had it’s critics.  An outraged 1909 letter to the editor of the New York Times railed against the ‘villainous contrivance’ which was said to ‘thicken the tongue and deform the mouth’ (New York Times, June 22, 2014).  Despite these warnings, the use of the pacifier has grown; and still experts continue to object. Pediatricians, speech and language pathologists, dental hygienists, dentists, orthodontist and orofacial myologists all recognize that prolonged use can negatively impact upon good facial, dental and articulation development.

Here’s why: when the pacifier is inserted in the mouth, the jaw opens beyond its normal position, increasing the vertical dimension.  This increased vertical dimension can cause the face to grow long and narrow (Long Face Syndrome).As the face develops and grows, the bottom jaw grows down and back creating a retruded lower jaw.

With continued sucking, the mouth is opened for a prolonged period of time. The cheek muscles create tension and help to pull the hard palate downwards.The tongue drops down and under the pacifier which then pushes the pacifier up against the roof of the mouth. This light continuous pressure of the pacifier, along with the added tension of the cheek muscles, can help change the palate from wide and rounded into a high and narrow shape.

This is alarming as the roof of the mouth is the floor of the nasal cavity. As the child grows, this upwards pressure against the hard palate can buckle the nasal septum, causing a deviated septum; in turn, causing difficulty with consistent nasal breathing. Mouth breathing ensues.

Extensive pacifier use can also alter dental eruption. The pacifier can create an anterior open bite as it blocks the front teeth from coming in.  Once the sucking habit is eliminated and the obstruction is removed, the teeth will be allowed to erupt and drift together.  Its imperative that a prolonged sucking habit never start but more importantly, it doesn’t persist beyond 4 years of age.  Many of my adult patients with a history of Temporal Mandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) reported they were pacifier/digit suckers for years.

In addition, with the tongue resting low in the mouth, the jaw hinged open with lips parted causes the muscles to be underused, underdeveloped and weak. The tongue isn’t placed properly in the oral cavity. This can lead to a frontal or lateral lisp, imprecise speech or multiple misarticulations.

Developmentally, babies don’t need the pacifier to self-soothe after six months of age. Persistent, vigorous sucking beyond the age of four creates those negative changes just described.

This is compared to typical or preferred oral rest postures.  The lips are closed with the tongue placed up against the roof of the mouth.  The correct tongue position acts as scaffolding to ensure development of wide rounded dental arches.  A slight space between the teeth, known as the dental freeway space, should occur.  Nasal breathing is observed at rest.

The best way to avoid orthodontic, TMD or speech issues is to break the pacifier habit early. Start weaning your child from sucking as early as you can. An orofacial myofunctional therapist can help your child break the habit. Children 3 years of age or older can follow a positive behavior program!

Remember:

If your child is still using the pacifier, remove it nightly once your child falls asleep; using your fingers, gently place their lips together.  This approach should be used during nap time too.

Another approach to help your child break the pacifier sucking habit is to cut a hole in the nipple of the pacifier.  This makes it difficult to suck the pacifier and your child will loose interest.

Article originally appeared at: http://myologyworks.com

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