2019 - Downtown Toronto Dentist | Toronto Dentistry | Soho Dental 2019 - Downtown Toronto Dentist | Toronto Dentistry | Soho Dental

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Archive for 2019

restoring smiles award

Dr. Haji Wins “Restoring Smiles” Award

Thank you to Restoring Smiles and Dr. Tina Meisami ⁣

I was quite taken by surprise to receive an award for my work with Restoring Smiles. It has been an honour and privilege to be a part of an amazing team of dentists and volunteers who want to give back. ⁣

Restoring Smiles provides free dental services to women who have survived domestic violence. Patients self-identify as survivors of domestic abuse, and all are currently living in shelters or supportive housing.⁣

Restoring Smiles’ goal is to eliminate pain, restore function and proper speech, and to some degree, alleviate the emotional trauma that arises as a result of domestic violence. The group provides dental treatment as a concrete and real way to help end our patients’ experience with domestic violence and to support her recovery process.⁣

Please visit their website for more information about the organization and ways to help. https://www.drbmeisamifoundation.com/about/restoring-smiles/

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Dawson Study Club

Dentists & Lab Techs in the Toronto area – The Dawson study club is starting another year and we’re welcoming new members! I am truly honoured to lead this great group this year.

Our current members are talented and have spent considerable energy developing some pretty amazing skills. It’s really exhilarating to have an open discussion on how each one of us approaches a case!

I decided to become a study club leader in order to promote a better way to do dentistry and to create a supportive environment. The Dawson Academy has taught me a way to give patients superior treatment in a relaxed, predictable way. I hope you’ll consider joining! You can find out more information by messaging me directly.

Dr. Feisel Haji

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acidic foods

Acidic Diets and Tooth Erosion

Sugar isn’t the only culprit when it comes to tooth decay. High levels of acid in everyday foods and drinks can be just as harmful. From oranges to wine, high-acid foods and drinks can wear away your teeth, causing decay, sensitivity and discoloring. But that doesn’t mean you have to strike all acidic foods and drinks from your diet. The way you consume these items can lessen their damage on your teeth.

What is tooth erosion?

When the enamel, or protective surface of your teeth, wears away, it exposes the underlying material, called dentin. This leaves your tooth vulnerable to plaque and bacteria, which cause decay.

What causes tooth erosion?

Calcium is a key ingredient in building strong teeth. Unfortunately, exposing your teeth to acid can leach calcium from your enamel, causing this protective surface to break down. Acid can come from many sources, including the following:

  • Wine. Whether you choose red, white or rosé, drinking wine will soften your enamel.
  • Fruit juice. The most acidic options include lemon, cranberry, orange and apple.
  • Citric fruits. Snacking on oranges, lemons and limes can wear down your teeth.
  • Candy. No sugary sweets are good for your teeth, but pay extra attention to avoid sour gummies and candies.
  • Sugar. Even though sugar itself does not contain high levels of acidity, it promotes the growth of acid-creating bacteria in your mouth, creating an acidic environment.
  • Stomach acid. Vomiting and reflux also can cause serious tooth damage when stomach acid comes into contact with your teeth. If you suffer from an eating disorder, acid reflux or a related condition, seek professional help.

What are some signs of tooth erosion?

Acid wear may lead to serious dental problems. It is important to notice the signs of tooth erosion in its early stages (sensitivity and discoloration) before more severe damage occur, such as cracks, pain and decay.

  • Sensitivity. As your teeth’s protective enamel wears away, you may feel a twinge of pain when you consume hot, cold or sweet food and drink. As more enamel is worn away, teeth become increasingly sensitive.
  • Discoloration. Teeth can become increasingly yellow as the thinning enamel layer exposes the underlying dentin.
  • Rounded teeth. Your teeth may have a rounded or “sand-blasted” look.
  • Transparency. Your front teeth may appear slightly translucent near the edges.
  • Cracks. Small cracks and roughness may appear at the edges of teeth.
  • Cupping. Small dents may appear on the chewing surface of the teeth, and fillings may appear to be rising up out of the tooth.

What can I do to prevent tooth erosion?

Follow these tips to reduce the effects of acid on your teeth.

  • Eat with meals. Instead of snacking throughout the day, save acidic foods for mealtimes. This will reduce their contact with your teeth and help neutralize the acid by eating it with other foods.
  • Wash down with water. Sip water alongside or after the acidic food or drink to wash it out of your mouth.
  • Use a straw. If you drink acidic beverages, reduce their contact with your teeth by using a straw and finishing the drink quickly, instead of sipping over a long period of time.
  • Look for low or no-sugar drinks. Read nutrition labels to keep down your sugar consumption and consider options like water, tea and coconut water.
  • Wait before brushing. Acid softens your enamel, so brushing immediately after eating or drinking high-acid foods or drinks can actually cause damage. Wait at least half an hour and then start brushing. In the meantime, you can always rinse your mouth with tap water.
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I’d like to introduce you to….

I have known Mary-Anne for most of my dental career. We first met about twenty years ago, when she was a representative for Ivoclar and I was an associate in a suburban practice. Over the years Mary-Anne has offered her talent and skills to many other dental companies. Her passion, commitment and dedication was always at the forefront.

As dentists, we all know how important it is to have support. Mary-Anne has always supported her dentists. She understands us and our unique psychology.

Beyond that however, Mary-Anne has supported me in many other aspects of my life. She has listened to my many rants, cared for me in my fragile moments, advised me when I needed guidance and reassured me that she is always there if I need her.

I am fortunate to have her my life. I am even more fortunate to be able to call her a very dear friend. Thank you Mary-Anne for your kindness and friendship. ❤

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Back-to-School Tips for Healthy Teeth

Dental hygiene, good diet and regular checkups make for pearly whites, expert says

The beginning of a new school year is usually a big transition, as lazy summer mornings are quickly replaced by mad dashes to the bus stop.

But a pediatric dental expert warns that your children’s tooth care shouldn’t be lost in the mix.

“In the hustle and bustle of back-to-school, dental care often falls by the wayside,” Gretchen Henson, program director of advanced education in pediatric dentistry in the department of dental medicine at Interfaith Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., said in a hospital news release.

There are some steps children and parents can take to help ensure their teeth stay healthy and cavity-free:

  • Brush before breakfast. There is little time to spare on most school mornings. Sometimes kids eat their breakfast on the way to school. It’s not necessary to wait until after breakfast to brush. This will help ensure kids brush their teeth before heading off to school. “The goal is to prevent the pH of the mouth from dropping to an unsafe zone since cavities form in an acidic environment,” said Henson. “Studies show that if we brush before we eat, the mouth’s pH will not dip low enough to form cavities.”
  • Don’t micromanage. Some parents tell kids to hold off brushing until after they’ve fixed their child’s hair. Allow children to brush their teeth while their hair is being done so no time is wasted and teeth are clean.
  • Consider diet. School meals may contain processed and sugary foods. Parents who pack their child’s lunch should focus on sending perishable items, such as fruits and vegetables, that will provide children with healthy alternatives.
  • Don’t overthink it. A little variety is nice, but there is no harm in giving kids the same lunch each day if it means it will be healthier. For example, cutting fruits and vegetables, and adding hummus and pita bread is healthy and convenient.
  • Consider shelf life. Packaged foods that can sit on the shelf for a long period of time, such as crackers and pretzels, contain starch. Starch coats the teeth and can breed cavity-causing bacteria. Since kids may get these snacks at school, parents should avoid adding them to their pantry at home. Instead, opt for fresh fruits and vegetables or dried fruits like raisins.
  • Choose water. Juice often contains more sugar than children should have in an entire day. This sugar can coat the teeth, promoting tooth decay. Sugar can also lead to an afternoon crash, which interferes with schoolwork. Instead of juice, give kids fruit and teach children to drink water.
  • Be safe. Kids participating in organized sports should wear mouth protection. This is particularly true if they play soccer, baseball and basketball. Children should also always wear a helmet when riding bicycles or scooters. Helmets should also be worn when roller skating or rollerblading.
  • Seek help. Children who fall on their face should visit the nurse and the dentist. Sometimes issues can develop slowly. A minor problem could actually affect the root of a tooth. If a permanent tooth is knocked out it must be replaced within 30 minutes. Never scrub a tooth that has fallen out, even if it looks dirty. This could kill its root.
  • Don’t expect pain. Cavities in children don’t hurt until they become infected. So, some children with cavities may not complain about tooth pain.
  • Be careful about braces. Dental care for those with braces is even more important. It can be tough to brush around braces and plaque can build up, leading to permanent damage. Teens often wear braces and hormonal changes that take place during adolescence can alter bacteria in the mouth.

Article originally appeared at: https://consumer.healthday.com

Author:  Mary Elizabeth Dallas

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Extaro 300

A close up video look at the #Extaro Dental Microscope in use at Soho Dental in Toronto by Dr. Feisel Haji.

This incredible ultra high tech dental microscope by Extaro allows us to complete ultra accurate work, and help you build the best possible smile for life!

#Dental #Dentist #SohoDentalToronto #DrFeiselHaji

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Veneers

When do we consider veneers instead of bonding?

Meet “Carol”. Carol was concerned about the appearance of her front teeth. She had previous bonding in the past which had stained and chipped. The two lateral incisors are also dark when compared to the other teeth. 

In order to improve Carol’s smile, we needed to mask the darkness of the lateral incisors and lengthen them in order to achieve pleasing proportions. The two front teeth also had to be narrowed very slightly in order to balance the smile. With the changes needed in the colour and shape of the teeth, in addition to the fact that the teeth already had bonding that was failing, I decided that veneers were the best treatment option for Carol. 

How do I determine the correct proportions? Before we started any treatment, I took a series of photographs and study models in order to plan Carol’s treatment.  I then let Carol try out the proposed changes with temporary veneers

Temporary veneers are a very important part of the treatment because they allow me to fine tune the way the future veneers will look, feel and function during speaking and chewing. The front teeth have a very precise position in the mouth in order to look and feel good and the temporary veneers help me determine that position. 

The picture of the veneers is a few years after the original picture was taken. Carol has been speaking, chewing and smiling with these veneers for some time now. I wonder if Carol realizes how much she makes me smile when she comes in for her cleanings

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Dark Front Teeth

Dark Front Teeth

“Rebecca” has been self conscious about her dark front tooth ever since she had the accident. She fell and her front tooth took a hard hit. As a result, the tooth needed a root canal treatment. ⁣⁣⁣

A tooth can darken considerably after trauma and although Rebecca never had any pain in the tooth after the root canal, the discoloured tooth was an aesthetic issue for her. We tried to bleach the tooth from the inside, what we call internal whitening. This lightened the tooth somewhat but it still remained noticeably darker than the other teeth. ⁣⁣⁣

We decided on a porcelain crown to solve the problem. To match one front tooth crown to the natural teeth is one of the biggest challenges that we have in dentistry. I had to be sure that my preparation of Rebecca’s tooth was precise to allow my lab technician to mask the dark tooth. Also, I had to make sure that the where the crown meets the tooth, what we call the margin, was just below the gums so that it was not noticeable. Going too far below the gums with the margin can cause red, sore gums, so this was a very important consideration. ⁣⁣⁣

Cosmetic or aesthetic dentistry not only involves making sure the teeth look nice but also making sure that the gums are healthy and aesthetic as well. They are just as important to the final result! ⁣⁣⁣

In the end, we have a natural looking crown that blends well with the other teeth. The gums around the crown are healthy and happy. I finished Rebecca ‘s smile by fixing the small chip in the tooth beside the crown with a little bonding. ⁣⁣⁣

The greatest pleasure for me is seeing Rebecca smile with confidence. She now smiles freely and openly. And seeing her so happy has me smiling as well. It’s always more than just fixing teeth! ⁣⁣⁣

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